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Charbok
10-14-2007, 07:56 PM
The Revolutionary War: Revolutionary?
By Austin McLaughlin


The Revolutionary War has always been known as a valiant effort against a tyrannical British government to gain they’re well deserved freedom. But does the Revolutionary War earn the title of “revolutionary”? Revolutionary is often interpreted as the overthrow of a government, or a significant change in social culture. These of course, are simply straightforward definitions, which cannot always be reliable in the research and proving of a particular thesis. We must look at the point of views throughout the war to even touch base with an accurate consensus.
The Revolutionary War is considered by many, the most important war in American history. It defied Britain, its mother country, and went against the odds for an underdog victory against the world superpower of the time. Is this enough to consider the war revolutionary? Probably not, but we can see that it did go against a powerful government, which is part of being revolutionary.
The second part of being revolutionary is the overthrow of a government. We know that the Americans defied the British government, but did the overthrow it?

“Overthrow:
1. To throw over; overturn.
2. To bring about the downfall or destruction of, especially by force or concerted action”

Look at the second definition, it directly relates to the situation of the colonies in that time. They did not “bring the downfall” of the British government, because as we can see, Britain is still around today. Strike one for the Revolution.

The third way to determine whether something was revolutionary is to find out what the colonists thoughts and goals were for the war. If they intended to overthrow the government, but failed, that does not make their actions any less revolutionary. Since the colonists simply planned on getting Britain away from America, and not doing any overthrowing or government purging, the actions of the colonists were not revolutionary by this mean either. Strike 2 for the Revolution.

One out of three isn’t so bad, but it also isn’t enough to be considered revolutionary. Since the American Revolution wasn’t Revolutionary by definition, why did they name it the “Revolutionary War”? That is a question that may never be answered.


Yea, just need an editing if possible.
Thanks!
~Charbok

EmBreon
10-19-2007, 10:37 AM
The Revolutionary War: Revolutionary?
By Austin McLaughlin


The Revolutionary War has always been known as a valiant effort against a tyrannical British government to gain their ("they're" is a contraction of "they are", "their" is the possession form) well deserved freedom. But, (starting off a sentence with "but" is only acceptable if you follow it with a comma and an individual idea) does the Revolutionary War earn the title of “revolutionary”? The term "revolutionary" is often interpreted as the overthrow of a government, or a significant change in social culture. These of course, are simply straightforward definitions, (<- do not need comma) which cannot always be reliable in the research and proving of a particular thesis. We must look at the point of views throughout the war to even touch base with an accurate consensus.

The Revolutionary War is considered by many to be the most important war in American history. It defied Britain, its mother country, and went against the odds for an underdog victory against the world superpower of the time. Is this enough to consider the war revolutionary? Probably not, but we can see that it did go against a powerful government, which is part of being revolutionary.

The second part of being revolutionary is the overthrow of a government. We know that the Americans defied the British government, but did they overthrow it?

“Overthrow:
1. To throw over; overturn.
2. To bring about the downfall or destruction of, especially by force or concerted action”

Look at the second definition; it directly relates to the situation of the colonies in that time. They did not “bring the downfall” of the British government, because as we can see, Britain is still around today. Strike one for the Revolution.

The third way to determine whether something was revolutionary is to find out what the colonists' (multiple possession follows the last 's' ) thoughts and goals were for the war. If they intended to overthrow the government, but failed, that does not make their actions any less revolutionary. Since the colonists simply planned on getting Britain away from America, and not doing any overthrowing or government purging, the actions of the colonists were not revolutionary by this mean either. Strike two (it is informal to leave numbers in number form unless using dates) for the Revolution.

One out of three isn’t so bad, but it also isn’t enough to be considered revolutionary. Since the American Revolution wasn’t Revolutionary by definition, why did they name it the “Revolutionary War”? That is a question that may never be answered.

Never completely trust Word. Just because something is not underlined does not necessarily mean it is right, and if it is underlined, it does not always mean that it's wrong. Word is just a computer program after all, and the English language is pretty evil sometimes.

Anyways, I fixed what I noticed; good luck.

Charbok
10-20-2007, 07:06 PM
Alright, thanks.

That's two I owe you.