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Abcnonn
03-24-2009, 07:45 PM
In the jackinthebox song, a monkeys chasin a weasel. why does the weasel go 'pop'? I think he 8 2 much rice krispy treats, and fell in a milk puddle. post what u think.

(and, yes, i said I'd never return. well, i got bored.)

Mewchirio
03-24-2009, 07:46 PM
In the jackinthebox song, a monkeys chasin a weasel. why does the weasel go 'pop'? I think he 8 2 much rice krispy treats, and fell in a milk puddle. post what u think.

(and, yes, i said I'd never return. well, i got bored.)
You really need to add a poll to this, and make the question understandable

~Mewchirio~

Abcnonn
03-24-2009, 07:48 PM
In the song 'pop goes the weasel", why does the weasel suddenly go "pop"? and If theres a place 4 "post ur opinion here", then feel free 2 send this there.

Mewchirio
03-24-2009, 08:26 PM
In the song 'pop goes the weasel", why does the weasel suddenly go "pop"? and If theres a place 4 "post ur opinion here", then feel free 2 send this there.
Better. And the answer is, because it does

~Mewchirio~

Dark Turtwig
03-24-2009, 08:31 PM
He ate some poison baby. :sick:

Ranma
03-24-2009, 09:11 PM
It held its lips in a manner so when they slid open they made the pop sound we hear.

George Jefferson
03-24-2009, 09:28 PM
I always took the song as a sexual joke.

Psychedelic Shroomish
03-24-2009, 09:33 PM
the weasel was tired of that damned monkey chasing him around the mole burry bush so he popped a cap.

Stinky
03-24-2009, 09:36 PM
I think that the monkey was not a monkey, but in fact, a Siberian Tiger. As to why the weasel went pop, I am not sure.

TeirusuFX
03-24-2009, 09:43 PM
The answer is simple, the weasel pours some Rice Krispes and pours milk over them

Only then, can you hear a 'pop'

♪テイルス♪
♫Teirusu♫

iReign
03-24-2009, 09:46 PM
The weasel went pop because that damn monkey be buggin mayne, people be gettin' tired of the mess yo'. :mad2:

George Jefferson
03-24-2009, 09:52 PM
I always took the song as a sexual joke.

Since no one else is quoting this.

Ajarr
03-24-2009, 10:33 PM
The weasel popped to scare the damn monkey off.

TeirusuFX
03-24-2009, 11:07 PM
Since no one else is quoting this.

I saw it the first time, you don't need to quote yourself to be noticed :P

Now I'll bother to ask...How?

♪テイルス♪
♫Teirusu♫

Yoda55
03-24-2009, 11:09 PM
I don't have the slightest idea:goofy:

Yoda55
03-24-2009, 11:10 PM
Because someone put a grenade under his butt, he blew up, and poped! :rolleyes:
I could not care less.

Abcnonn
03-26-2009, 07:38 PM
um... yeah, the 'poll' portion, don't vote there. funny tho it is...

Nitro
03-26-2009, 10:55 PM
I blame it on rape. D:

atucker22
03-27-2009, 08:00 PM
I think he ate pop rocks and coke or he ate fire crackers and the he was running around so fast that he caught on fire then BOOOOOOOOOM!!!!!

AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs
03-27-2009, 08:15 PM
Because it's a childs nursery rhyme.
Things are always left unexplained, an example you ask?

"Jack be nimble,
Jack be quick
Jack jump over the candlestick"

Try to make heads or tails from that.

Kendo
03-27-2009, 10:09 PM
He exploded. Or something, I hardly have any idea.

Black Hawk
03-27-2009, 10:15 PM
Because someone put a grenade under his butt, he blew up, and pooped! :rolleyes:
I could not care less.

Why did he poop when the butt grenade blow? Wouldn't his pooper be annihiliated?

And I think its because secretly the monkey is a British colonist in India with a rifle and that **** weasel is eatin' his cats and vegetables and what not and scarin' away all 'dem snakes that he likes t' cook up for the neighborhood Don't-Eat-Cow Block Party.

Tory vs Meaty II
03-28-2009, 04:02 AM
Tory: I don't get how this is funny.
Meaty: me either.

Ah Beng I the Pikabeng
04-04-2009, 10:08 AM
Huh. I just think its body couldn't take it when it got chased. So it went pop.

What do the options mean, anyway?

Gold Rush
04-06-2009, 12:53 PM
Because I told it to :cool:
And he was oppening some Fanta :crosseye:

Orange_Flaaffy
04-06-2009, 01:09 PM
It's actually a song about the working class in England :smile:

Another interpretation derives from the need for the poor working class to have to "pop" their coats (weasels and stoats in rhyming slang): that is, taken them to a pawnbroker to obtain money for drinking. Another possibility is that "weasel" is a corruption of "whistle" and means "suit" (in this case being derived from "whistle and flute"). In either interpretation, the rhyme describes the pawning of the worker's only valuable items the "Sunday best" clothing after exhausting the week's wages on the food items

Vaughn
04-06-2009, 01:11 PM
A translation.

One interpretation of "Pop Goes the Weasel" is that it is about silk weavers working with their shuttle or bobbin (known as a "weasand" or "weasel"). Another interpretation derives from the need for the poor working class to have to "pop" their coats (weasels and stoats in rhyming slang): that is, taken them to a pawnbroker to obtain money for drinking. Another possibility is that "weasel" is a corruption of "whistle" and means "suit" (in this case being derived from "whistle and flute"). In either interpretation, the rhyme describes the pawning of the worker's only valuable items the "Sunday best" clothing after exhausting the week's wages on the food items such as rice and treacle, which, though cheap, were and are fundamentally useless to anyone if the buyer is poor and has nothing to eat them with. It is thought, however, that early "quack" doctors would have prescribed treacle as a sort of medicine, and gullible purchasing workers that were prone to illness due to exposure would doubtless have spent their savings on trying to maintain their and their children's health.
- Wikipedia.

Ridley
04-06-2009, 10:24 PM
Sneasel used Selfdestruct.

Ah Beng I the Pikabeng
04-07-2009, 11:47 AM
Sneasel used Selfdestruct.

I checked, and it can't use that or Explosion.

Those last few posts before yours actually make sense. :P

Ridley
04-07-2009, 06:53 PM
I checked, and it can't use that or Explosion.


Uh, that's the exact reason WHY I said that.

neohunter
04-07-2009, 07:20 PM
The weasel knew too much. The CIA sent the monkey which couldn't catch it, so they made it go pop.


XD

Ah Beng I the Pikabeng
04-09-2009, 02:08 PM
Uh, that's the exact reason WHY I said that.

Eh, what do you mean?

I find it pointless to say something that doesn't make sense at all and is totally illogical...

Abcnonn
06-17-2009, 10:05 PM
Someone pointed out that the options make no sense. I don't know of an "opinion here" section, so I put it in polls.

Loyal Kingdra
06-17-2009, 10:15 PM
Pop, probably means to jump/flinch so the Monkey probably did something to it.

Gamedude
06-17-2009, 10:34 PM
One word: spam


And pop goes the weasly is somethin that happens between a girl and a guy ;)

Abcnonn
06-17-2009, 11:06 PM
And pop goes the weasly is somethin that happens between a girl and a guy ;)

I'd really rather this thread be rated G or even PG, not R

Master Aqua
06-18-2009, 02:25 PM
It's cause weasels liek to explode.

Skylands
06-18-2009, 03:59 PM
"...in North America, the opening line was generally "all around the mulberry bush," possibly due to conflation with the similar tune "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush." In the UK, however, it was usually "all around the cobbler's bench." This gives us a better idea of the song's original meaning. Most authorities think "Pop Goes the Weasel" describes the acts of weaving, spinning, and sewing. A weasel, Tom reports, was a mechanism used by tailors, cobblers, and hatters that "popped" when the spool was full of thread.

Some argue that to pop the weasel is also cockney slang meaning to pawn one's coat. This makes sense in light of the second verse of the kids' version: "A penny for a spool of thread / A penny for a needle / That's the way the money goes," etc. A version popular in 19th-century English music halls makes things even clearer: "Up and down the City Road / In and out the Eagle / That's the way the money goes," etc. The Eagle in question was a London tavern; clearly the lyricist was describing the consequences of spending too little time at the cobbler's bench and too much on a barstool."

Hope that helps~

Abcnonn
06-23-2009, 07:24 PM
"...in North America, the opening line was generally "all around the mulberry bush," possibly due to conflation with the similar tune "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush." In the UK, however, it was usually "all around the cobbler's bench." This gives us a better idea of the song's original meaning. Most authorities think "Pop Goes the Weasel" describes the acts of weaving, spinning, and sewing. A weasel, Tom reports, was a mechanism used by tailors, cobblers, and hatters that "popped" when the spool was full of thread.

Some argue that to pop the weasel is also cockney slang meaning to pawn one's coat. This makes sense in light of the second verse of the kids' version: "A penny for a spool of thread / A penny for a needle / That's the way the money goes," etc. A version popular in 19th-century English music halls makes things even clearer: "Up and down the City Road / In and out the Eagle / That's the way the money goes," etc. The Eagle in question was a London tavern; clearly the lyricist was describing the consequences of spending too little time at the cobbler's bench and too much on a barstool."

Hope that helps~

It Does.

Ah Beng I the Pikabeng
06-24-2009, 03:06 AM
"...in North America, the opening line was generally "all around the mulberry bush," possibly due to conflation with the similar tune "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush." In the UK, however, it was usually "all around the cobbler's bench." This gives us a better idea of the song's original meaning. Most authorities think "Pop Goes the Weasel" describes the acts of weaving, spinning, and sewing. A weasel, Tom reports, was a mechanism used by tailors, cobblers, and hatters that "popped" when the spool was full of thread.

Some argue that to pop the weasel is also cockney slang meaning to pawn one's coat. This makes sense in light of the second verse of the kids' version: "A penny for a spool of thread / A penny for a needle / That's the way the money goes," etc. A version popular in 19th-century English music halls makes things even clearer: "Up and down the City Road / In and out the Eagle / That's the way the money goes," etc. The Eagle in question was a London tavern; clearly the lyricist was describing the consequences of spending too little time at the cobbler's bench and too much on a barstool."

Hope that helps~

Well yep it does. Thanks. :D

aeria
06-24-2009, 07:00 PM
Because he likes too.